The Music Industry Will Need To Win More Than Just The Legal Arguments In Capital v. Thomas

They do things differently in Sweden.  If there was an RSS feed for all the political news happening in Sweden, I think I would subscribe.  I remember in college hearing that Donald Duck beat out several political parties in the Swedish elections.  You know it is time to give it up and run for the dog catcher position when you lose to Donald Duck.

The independent streak seems to continue today.  For most of us, the only way last week’s European Union parliamentary elections were going to catch our attention was if another Donald Duck episode occurred.  Sure enough, the voters in Sweden obliged.

In a reaction to the landmark file-sharing case (i.e. sharing of music, movies and books) popularly known by the file-sharing site’s name, the Pirate Bay, the voters elected a member of Sweden’s Pirate Party to the European Parliament. For those who are not up to speed with the Pirate Bay case, take a look at the the Wall Street Journal post for background or just know that Sweden’s tolerant view on copyright infringement changed when a court announced that the Pirate Bay defendants were liable to the record companies to the tune of $3.6 million.  Apparently, the Swedish voters were not pleased with the court’s decision and voted in protest for the Pirate Party.

But, don’t just file this under:  “Funny Things That Happen In Sweden.”  Of the thousands of copyright litigation cases that the music industry filed here in the U.S., only one ever made it to trial.  And that case returned to the courtroom this week.

The case is Capital v. Thomas and involves six record companies suing Jammie Thomas for allegedly using a peer-to-peer network to share and download music.  To learn the details of the case, I recommend reading Ben Sheffner’s posts.  He has been blogging extensively about the case and is covering each blow-by-blow during the trial.

I don’t predict that the outcome of the trial will launch new political parties in the U.S. who send representatives to Washington D.C. under a pirate flag.  But, managing the public’s perception of the case will be important.  The voters who sent the Pirate Party to Parliament were largely 18-24 year olds — an important demographic for the music industry and a group that will soon move on to positions where they will make policy decisions on copyright issues for years to come.

Right or wrong, the music industry needs to not only win the Thomas case, but also the public relations battle as well.  If it does, the music industry will be able to quote one of our favorite pirates,Captain Jack Sparrow, who said:  “I think we’ve all arrived at a very special place. Spiritually, ecumenically, grammatically.”  “Savvy?

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About Dave Rein

Dave Rein focuses on and will continue to focus on copyright, trademark and patent litigation until the National Geographic adds him to its staff of photographers. In addition to counseling and litigating on behalf of the firm’s clients, he also helps clients through the Kansas City Volunteer Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts where he also serves as a board member. Prior to representing clients, Dave clerked for a federal district court judge who kindly provided invaluable advice and mentorship
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